181 | P a g e 9. BARKER 2016 [187]: Biographical fracture—osteoporosis is manifest: Fear of what is to come I am worried about what the future might bring. If the treatment is successful this will give me some hope. I fear the unpredictable consequences of OP. I fear loss of mobility, being wheelchair bound, being dependent on others, further fractures, falls and deformity. OSTEOPOROSIS 10. BARKER 2016 [187]: Biographical fracture—osteoporosis is manifest: I am becoming isolated Relationships with people I care about underpin my health and quality of life. I have become isolated and depend on family and friends for social contact. Continuing pain affects my relationships with family and friends. I avoid social situations. I feel vulnerable, lonely and abandoned. I would like to be able to talk to other people with OP about this experience and become more confident. OSTEOPOROSIS 11. BARKER 2016 [187]: Biographical fracture—osteoporosis is manifest: I am watching my body get old The physical changes of OP are synonymous with becoming ‘old’. My loss of height and deformity are hallmark of both OP and ageing. I do not want to accept the diagnosis of OP because it’s seen in our culture as a mark of being old. This threatens my personal identity. I am diminished (shrunken, stooped, bent). I don’t want to be like her... OSTEOPOROSIS 12. BARKER 2016 [187]: Biographical fracture—osteoporosis is manifest: I don‘t want to rely on other people My autonomy and independence are integral to good health & quality of life. Dependency on my family members has profoundly altered my role in the family. Having to accept help (particularly with personal care) is one of the most difficult things to do. At times, relatives can be ‘too’ helpful. Equally, it is not easy to ask for help when I need it. Although I am pleased to get help, it is not always available. This is a frank reminder that I am getting old. OSTEOPOROSIS
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